True Forensics

Hic locus est ubi mors gaudet succurrere vitae

497 notes

jangojips:

valdanderthal:

macabre-mind-94:

Differences between male and female skulls.

Some of this stuff overlaps into ancestry as well but it’s a good quick guide 

In GENERAL, males have more pronounced, robust cranial features. It is important to remember that there is a lot of overlap in reality, and many skulls are ambiguous or have a percentage of uncertainty!

jangojips:

valdanderthal:

macabre-mind-94:

Differences between male and female skulls.

Some of this stuff overlaps into ancestry as well but it’s a good quick guide 

In GENERAL, males have more pronounced, robust cranial features. It is important to remember that there is a lot of overlap in reality, and many skulls are ambiguous or have a percentage of uncertainty!

(via scientific-women)

80 notes

Forgive my lack of posts. I’m dealing with the death of a family member.

I’ll be back posting when I can.

Thanks for your understanding

418 notes

goingtofall:

For over 30 years the Forensic Anthropology Centre has used body farms for research and training. 
1.3 acres of land are used to study human decomposition under various circumstances. They study everything from the rate of bacterial decomposition to foreign organisms feeding on the body. All of this information is then used to help forensic anthropologists, pathologists, and crime scene investigators pinpoint time of death among other things.
There are about 5 ‘farms’ of this type in the country. 
You can make arrangements to have your body donated to the farm. 
(x) (x)

goingtofall:

For over 30 years the Forensic Anthropology Centre has used body farms for research and training. 

1.3 acres of land are used to study human decomposition under various circumstances. They study everything from the rate of bacterial decomposition to foreign organisms feeding on the body. All of this information is then used to help forensic anthropologists, pathologists, and crime scene investigators pinpoint time of death among other things.

There are about 5 ‘farms’ of this type in the country. 

You can make arrangements to have your body donated to the farm. 

(x) (x)

5,283 notes

sixpenceee:

One of the greatest mysteries of the Himalayas is a small glacial lake named Roopkund. The lake is located in the Uttarakhand state of India, at an altitude of about 5,029 meters (16,499 feet). The area surrounding the lake is completely uninhabited and the water is a five day treacherous hike from civilization.

In 1942, Roopkund gained the name Skeleton Lake when over 500 human skulls, bones and artifacts were discovered surrounding and inside the ice. These human bones have baffled scientists for decades because historians don’t understand who these people were or what they were doing so high in the mountains.

In 2004, it was determined that the skulls contained severe head trauma. Based on this evidence it has been hypothesized that the people died from a sudden hailstorm. 

Probably the most remarkable discovery came after scientists conducted DNA tests on the bones, which proved to have a rich source of DNA material. The bodies were dated to AD 850. This date was 600 years earlier than initially reported.

Remarkably, the experts have found that the dead individuals belonged to two different teams. One team is marked by a shorter stature of the skeletons, while the other human bones are significantly taller. It remains unclear exactly who these people were.

SOURCE

CREEPY FACTS COMPILATION

245 notes

strangeremains:

Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient
In Sept. 13, 1848, at around 4:30 p.m., the time of day when the mind might start wandering, a railroad foreman named Phineas Gage filled a drill hole with gunpowder and turned his head to check on his men. It was the last normal moment of his life.
Other victims in the annals of medicine are almost always referred to by initials or pseudonyms. Not Gage: His is the most famous name in neuroscience. How ironic, then, that we know so little else about the man—and that much of what we think we know, especially about his life unraveling after his accident, is probably bunk.
Read more at Slate
Image credit: J.B.S. Jackson/A Descriptive Catalog of the Warren Anatomical Museum via Slate

strangeremains:

Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient

In Sept. 13, 1848, at around 4:30 p.m., the time of day when the mind might start wandering, a railroad foreman named Phineas Gage filled a drill hole with gunpowder and turned his head to check on his men. It was the last normal moment of his life.

Other victims in the annals of medicine are almost always referred to by initials or pseudonyms. Not Gage: His is the most famous name in neuroscience. How ironic, then, that we know so little else about the man—and that much of what we think we know, especially about his life unraveling after his accident, is probably bunk.

Read more at Slate

Image credit: J.B.S. Jackson/A Descriptive Catalog of the Warren Anatomical Museum via Slate

Scary Skull